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The low-risk way to make 30% a year in stocks

My team and I recently made a critical breakthrough… And it reinforces what I’ve been saying for years.

You don’t need to take big risks to make big money in the stock market.

You don’t have to find the needle in a haystack. You don’t have to get extremely lucky by picking the right tech stock.

In my Investment Advisory, we’re business junkies. We love great businesses. And usually, the kinds of businesses with staying power aren’t exciting or glamorous.

Last week, I told DailyWealth readers about my latest project to investigate the stocks that returned an incredible 1,000% or more over the past 20 years.

My team and I found a way to identify these stocks – the small, under-the-radar companies that have huge growth potential.

Today, I’ll explain one of the secret ingredients to boosting boring investments and making double-digit annual returns, without taking on more risk…

Regular readers know “capital efficiency” is one of our key metrics to finding successful businesses. (Read our educational essay on the subject here)

When we say “capital efficiency,” we’re measuring how easy it is for companies to grow revenues without heavy reinvestment. That’s how you find great, healthy investments. These are the companies that will keep growing and will never go out of business. It’s the one sure way to get rich in the market.

My colleague Bryan Beach puts it this way: When you think about capital efficiency, think about what you would want to see if you were the company’s owner.

In other words, when you have a business that’s growing like crazy but you aren’t making more money, you wouldn’t be excited to own that business. You’ve probably had to hire more people and deal with more problems. If cash isn’t left at the end of the day for the owners, what’s the point?

Personally, I look at it in a bigger-picture way… like a seesaw. On one end of the seesaw, you have growth. On the other end, you have profitability.

Think about my own company, Stansberry Research. If we wanted to spend $100 million on advertising, we could grow our business and sales tremendously, but it won’t lead to more profits. Or we could cut back our marketing budget to almost zero and live off the renewal income and the incremental sales, and we could report a great, profitable year. It’s really difficult to do both at the same time. And the businesses that can do that are exceedingly rare.

One of our big tests is whether a company can grow its revenues by 25% or 30% and still be capital efficient. When a company can make $0.25 or $0.30 in cash on every dollar of revenue AND continue to grow, you’ve found an extraordinary business.

Now here’s the really surprising thing about all this. Like I said, these are unique, unusual businesses. But more often than not… they’re boring.

When we investigated the stellar performers of the past two decades, the results we turned up weren’t necessarily the high-flying tech stocks. Most of them fit the same boring industry categories we’ve been writing about for years…

You find these stocks with the same process that we put all of our best recommendations through in my Investment Advisory. For instance, chocolatier Hershey (HSY) and insurance firm W.R. Berkley (WRB) were great investments because they had tremendous growth and were incredibly capital efficient.

But with our new system – the kind we’re using in Stansberry Venture Value – you see even better growth (and therefore, even bigger returns) buying the exact same kinds of stocks. Instead of making 6%-8% a year, these stocks can return 20%-30% a year.

Consistent, double-digit returns every year… without taking more risk… without crossing your fingers and hoping you picked the next big winner. The same reliable types of companies we recommend in my Investment Advisory… but with the ability to deliver 20% or 30% a year on your portfolio.

Regards,

Porter Stansberry

Crux note: Capital efficiency is just one piece of the puzzle. Now you can learn how to find the next McDonald’s, or the next Hershey, with a metric called the “D-Factor.” It’s the key to Porter’s new “10x Project,” designed to help you make 10 times your money or more in the markets. Get all the details by watching Porter’s brand-new presentation right here. (Or click here for a transcript.)

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ETFs Might Be a Bad Way To Play The Infrastructure Boom

When the president-elect pledged to facilitate a $1 trillion infrastructure-spending binge, exchange-traded funds with “infrastructure” in their name seemed like a sound way to cash in.

But that narrative was upended on Wednesday when the biggest product in that category — the iShares Global Infrastructure ETF (IGF) — suffered over $161 million in outflows; its largest one-day withdrawal on record.

IGF US Equity (iShares Global In 2017-01-05 09-38-40
Source: Bloomberg

Those hunting for the proximate cause of this exodus are less likely to find it in the taunts Donald Trump lobbed at Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer, who has expressed support for the future president’s infrastructure plan, than in the realization that with these funds, the wrapping paper often belies the present.

Read the rest of the article at Bloomberg